Safety on Campus

Safety on Campus

The most important advice I can share about safety on campus is to stay AWAKE & AWARE. So many students have a laid-back attitude about safety until something happens on campus. And students get into trouble when they become complacent and comfortable. Parents with kids leaving for college: Please take the time to have the tough conversation with your kid before they attend school. The following safety on campus guidelines can reduce the chances of someone becoming a victim of sexual assault, theft, or another common campus crime. SELF PROTECTION VS. SELF-DEFENSE “Self-protection is what allows you to prevent, identify and avoid violence. Self-defense is what you do when this isn’t sufficient or enough - the situation you are in suddenly changes, your assailant has managed to disguise the actions and behaviors that they need to engage in before assaulting you etc.” (SEPS) CAMPUS SAFETY TIPS We’re polling on social media to create awareness for young people on college campuses. Want to see the results of those polls? Please join the conversation and participate on Facebook. One of the best self-defense tips is contained in the acronym GFTG. What does GFTG stand for? If you feel unsafe walking through a dark parking lot at night, what is the first thing you should do? What should you do if an assailant grabs your hair? Which of the following is one of the most vulnerable places on the body? What’s the best defense if someone grabs you from...
Sexual Abuse Expert Elaine Williams Offers Tips to Prevent Rape on Campus

Sexual Abuse Expert Elaine Williams Offers Tips to Prevent Rape on Campus

BLOOMFIELD, N.J., /PRNewswire/ — As college students head back to school, they might put themselves in danger of being sexually assaulted by people they know, like and trust, said Elaine Williams, a popular speaker on the college circuit who helps protect women from sexual assaults and on-campus rape. Elaine Williams “There’s an epidemic of sexual assault on college campuses. As freshmen get more comfortable with their college life and routines, they are distracted by so many new stresses and don’t pay attention to safety practices,” said Williams, a sexual abuse survivor whose inspiring and soul-baring story of food, drug, and alcohol addiction is as educational as it is entertaining. She warns that rapists don’t look like monsters. “Predators can look and seem like nice, sweet guys. Many are very charismatic and great actors. They target freshmen, and transfer students who are new, shy, and nervous,” said Williams, author of “Stop the Madness.”“But women need to think about how to protect themselves because the rapists don’t act the way women think they would.” “Predators are sick in the head. They do not think that using alcohol as a weapon is wrong. They are psychopaths who think that because they aren’t hiding in the bushes and using a gun or a knife to rape they are just hooking up,” said Williams, who uses her training as a Certified Ford Institute life coach to fully engage and interact with her audiences. EDITOR’S NOTE: To interview Elaine on college newspapers, radio stations or TV stations, contact Elaine Williams Email or call 646-526-3522 Williams warns women to keep their guard up. Here are five tips she suggests...
Assault and Sexual Abuse – How to Know a Predator

Assault and Sexual Abuse – How to Know a Predator

America is riveted by new revelations about Bill Cosby. Most predators don’t look like predators, says Elaine Williams, a NJ assault expert and sexual abuse survivor. She’ll help your audience figure out how to know a predator and who they can trust and who they cannot. In her columns in the Huffington Post and in her speeches at college campuses and high schools across the country, the New Jersey resident uses her comedic talents to engage audiences, and discover that the way to your heart is NOT through your stomach; and that happiness is not found in a bottle. With humor, she addresses why so many students struggle and offers solutions for breaking bad habits now before it’s too late. She will educate and entertain your readers/listeners/viewers with humorous anecdotes and biting zingers that inform and amuse as she addresses these important issues: Rape culture – You put in teen-age brains, on top of social pressure, on top of binge drinking and you’ve created a volatile combination. Consent – With the explosion of social media, there is added pressure to be cool and look like your life is fun, fun, fun at all times. This environment can create easy, accessible “prey” for predators who also happen to be students. Porn myth – Women are being treated violently and they are made to appear to enjoy it. That’s not true in 98 percent of women I’ve interviewed. How to reduce incidences of abuse – Create safer environments for social, drinking events. Designate a sober “referee” at the parties since lines can get blurred whenever alcohol is involved. To interview Elaine call...

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